Trailer drops for Jordan Peele’s new horror movie, “Us”

Labolas

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Yeah, I'm very mixed on the movie. The acting and characters are great. But the story is where the movie fails. And really it's a more of a thriller than horror as well.

"The whole shadow/doppelganger plotline is very weak and isn't explained well. Why the government made them to begin with other than being nefarious? How does the underground lair contain millions and millions of US citizens? What about the homeless and immigrants, are they included? Fuck man, all I can think of is Nier did it better"

But it isn't a bad movie just a decent one that doesn't deserve the praise it's getting.
 
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JareBear

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I’ve avoided all spoilers so far but I’m probably not going to be able to see this movie in theaters so I’m thinking of just watching a spoiler review. I’m so curious about what is happening
 

JareBear

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So I watched it today. I didn’t see it theaters, the source quality was low (in fairness, it’s really hard for me to go see this in theaters right now and for the foreseeable future) but I still gotta say I think it’s great.

I liked Get Out, probably scored Get Out a solid 8 or high 7. I would give this an 8.5.

It’s fitting that Peele is presenting the new Twilight Zone because this kind of feels like a long Twilight Zone episode.

I’ll be honest, I feel like I don’t really “get it.” I kinda “get it,” but I mostly don’t. I’m gonna watch some of my favorite reviewers’ spoiler videos and listen to their interpretations.

Some of my thoughts:

So are “The Tethered” supposed represent poor people?” Is the metaphor here class warfare? That was my thought as the movie was playing.

My suspension of disbelief was struggling a little bit at certain points. The family was way too calm when The Tethered first went into the house. Like wouldn’t a big guy like Winston Duke be freaking the fuck out and going down swinging in that situation? Also when they were debating who should drive based on kill count, that felt way weird from a tonal perspective. Also when Duke was trying to negotiate with the others like “we can go to the ATM” like dude it’s obvious something beyond being robbed was happening.

So she says “if it weren’t for you I never would have danced at all,” and when she dances The Tethered believe in her, because dancing proved she was different (as she was in fact a “real person”)? Or am I just not getting the big picture here?

I get that the real girl gets a handcuffed to the bed as she is replaced, I get that’s why she had adult fake self handcuff herself to the table. I notice the fake self is saved by the handcuffs numerous times, using them as a weapon at one point. Is that a metaphor for something too?

I’ll watch it again. I probably just need smart people to explain the meaning behind everything.

Why could the son control his fake but no one else?

The twist seems obvious since she showed compassion to the Tethered children, right?

So did she forget she was Tethered as a child and it just came out in her subconscious at the end? Did she know all along?

Real Lupita says “I couldn’t just kill you, I had to make a statement” but what is the statement?

If anyone who understands the movie better than I can help me out there I’d appreciate it

Lupita will get nominated for the academy award and if she wins it will be well earned. She’s amazing in this.

Edit

Also

What was the significance of the number 11? It’s used numerous times
 
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MetalAlien

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Ever heard the saying avoid even the appearance of evil? It's a miss translation of Thessalonians 5:22. Anyway, I avoid even the appearance of politics disgused as a normal movie. I don't even know what the message this movie is trying to invoke. but i'll wait for redbox or something.
 

JareBear

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Ever heard the saying avoid even the appearance of evil? It's a miss translation of Thessalonians 5:22. Anyway, I avoid even the appearance of politics disgused as a normal movie. I don't even know what the message this movie is trying to invoke. but i'll wait for redbox or something.

I’m just curious, what movies do you watch, then?

I’d imagine your selection would be very limited?
 

MetalAlien

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I’m just curious, what movies do you watch, then?

I’d imagine your selection would be very limited?
You are correct about that. I used to see a movie a week at least. In the past few years that has dropped to a trickle. I still watch a shit ton of older movies though. I have the netflix that ships to your home. I get 3 dvds at a time and my list was over 200 titles deep at one point. This morning I watched Emmet Otter's Jug Band Christmas. (friend gave it to me)
 

Doom85

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Saw it last night, thought it was great. Not quite on par with Get Out, but Peele is still proving himself as a very creative director. Particularly loved the final fight, that choreography and music, SO GOOD.

As someone who feels that horror is often ruined by too much explanation, I'm not bothered by the full lack of details on the threat in the movie. Truth be told, I wish some of the details provided about their origin had been omitted and we were just left with some visual clues that give us some possibilities about their origin. I know other feel differently but that's my preference. Some say, "I really wish It Follows explained what It even was" and I'm like, "that's fine if you feel that way, but for me it would have made it less menacing."
 

Manus

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I did not enjoy the movie and it's rare I don't enjoy a horror film since it's my favorite genre. I'm sick of movies trying to have some sort of deeper meaning or social commentary. Cinematography was great and so was the soundtrack but other than that didn't find much else I liked about it.

Almost felt like some bad M. Night film come the second half of the film.
 

JareBear

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Saw it last night, thought it was great. Not quite on par with Get Out, but Peele is still proving himself as a very creative director. Particularly loved the final fight, that choreography and music, SO GOOD.

As someone who feels that horror is often ruined by too much explanation, I'm not bothered by the full lack of details on the threat in the movie. Truth be told, I wish some of the details provided about their origin had been omitted and we were just left with some visual clues that give us some possibilities about their origin. I know other feel differently but that's my preference. Some say, "I really wish It Follows explained what It even was" and I'm like, "that's fine if you feel that way, but for me it would have made it less menacing."

Peele himself said there really isn’t “an answer.” It sounds like he intended for the message to mean different things to different people. I dig that.
 

Aurelian

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I did not enjoy the movie and it's rare I don't enjoy a horror film since it's my favorite genre. I'm sick of movies trying to have some sort of deeper meaning or social commentary. Cinematography was great and so was the soundtrack but other than that didn't find much else I liked about it.

Almost felt like some bad M. Night film come the second half of the film.

To some extent, many if not most horror movies have a deeper meaning even if they don't appear to. They frequently tap into collective social anxieties and the morality of the time. For example, the classic '70s/'80s movies reflected the obsession with sexual 'purity,' where teens (especially girls) who slept around got killed while the chaste ones survived. The Shining? The novel is a commentary on alcoholism, and that persists to a lesser degree in Kubrick's movie.
 
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JareBear

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I really don’t feel like I was being hit over the head with political commentary.

Sure, it’s there, but it’s up for interpretation.

This movie feels like a puzzle.

Or, as Peele himself stated, “it’s a Rorschach test.”

I found the movie riveting, even if the second half goes a little balls wild.

I know there’s one line in the movie that maybe made people groan. I almost wish that line wasn’t in the movie as it’s the only part that feels a little too “on the nose.” We all know the line I’m talking about, or you will once you see it.

“We are Americans.”

Even I, a Liberal Cuckboy, rolled my eyes at this line.

Other than that one line I get everything was subtle enough.

Just me, though
 
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Nikana

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I did not enjoy the movie and it's rare I don't enjoy a horror film since it's my favorite genre. I'm sick of movies trying to have some sort of deeper meaning or social commentary. Cinematography was great and so was the soundtrack but other than that didn't find much else I liked about it.

Almost felt like some bad M. Night film come the second half of the film.

Literally said the same thing to my buddy.
 

JareBear

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There’s political/social commentary in most of your favorite movies, I would almost guarantee it. I always chuckle when I see people call The Winter Soldier their favorite MCU film then around and criticize politics in MCU films
 

cryptoadam

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So I watched it today. I didn’t see it theaters, the source quality was low (in fairness, it’s really hard for me to go see this in theaters right now and for the foreseeable future) but I still gotta say I think it’s great.

I liked Get Out, probably scored Get Out a solid 8 or high 7. I would give this an 8.5.

It’s fitting that Peele is presenting the new Twilight Zone because this kind of feels like a long Twilight Zone episode.

I’ll be honest, I feel like I don’t really “get it.” I kinda “get it,” but I mostly don’t. I’m gonna watch some of my favorite reviewers’ spoiler videos and listen to their interpretations.

Some of my thoughts:

So are “The Tethered” supposed represent poor people?” Is the metaphor here class warfare? That was my thought as the movie was playing.

My suspension of disbelief was struggling a little bit at certain points. The family was way too calm when The Tethered first went into the house. Like wouldn’t a big guy like Winston Duke be freaking the fuck out and going down swinging in that situation? Also when they were debating who should drive based on kill count, that felt way weird from a tonal perspective. Also when Duke was trying to negotiate with the others like “we can go to the ATM” like dude it’s obvious something beyond being robbed was happening.

So she says “if it weren’t for you I never would have danced at all,” and when she dances The Tethered believe in her, because dancing proved she was different (as she was in fact a “real person”)? Or am I just not getting the big picture here?

I get that the real girl gets a handcuffed to the bed as she is replaced, I get that’s why she had adult fake self handcuff herself to the table. I notice the fake self is saved by the handcuffs numerous times, using them as a weapon at one point. Is that a metaphor for something too?

I’ll watch it again. I probably just need smart people to explain the meaning behind everything.

Why could the son control his fake but no one else?

The twist seems obvious since she showed compassion to the Tethered children, right?

So did she forget she was Tethered as a child and it just came out in her subconscious at the end? Did she know all along?

Real Lupita says “I couldn’t just kill you, I had to make a statement” but what is the statement?

If anyone who understands the movie better than I can help me out there I’d appreciate it

Lupita will get nominated for the academy award and if she wins it will be well earned. She’s amazing in this.

Edit

Also

What was the significance of the number 11? It’s used numerous times

I didn't see them movie but read spoilers/reviews so in spoilers back to our conversation before the movie came out.

So looks like my predictions on the plot were pretty close. I was a bit off about the tethered since they were clones and not in their head or from another dimension, but I did say essentially that the tethered would be the family and that something happened in the past. Which is close enough since the mom was switched out and then she became a tethered and had the same clone family somehow.

One thing I heard was this movie cost a fraction of get out, which is surprising since usually budgets go up after a sucsesful movie.

I think Jordan might be tapped to helm a big budget movie soon. WE have seen it happen where smaller directors get fast tracked to Star Wars or Marvel or DC. Jordan has proven he is a top director so a studio is going to come calling.
 

JareBear

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I watched it a second time and focused on one of my spoiler thoughts from previous post:

The role of a specific object in the story:

The use/role of handcuffs. Tethered Lupita defends herself/saves herself with the handcuffs numerous times and flat out uses them to kill at least once. This HAS to be a statement of some sort about our criminal justice system, right? That can’t just be coincidental, could it?
 

MetalAlien

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There’s political/social commentary in most of your favorite movies, I would almost guarantee it. I always chuckle when I see people call The Winter Soldier their favorite MCU film then around and criticize politics in MCU films
Don't hit me over the head with it, that's all. That's why I find old school Anime hard to watch sometimes.
 

ViceUniverse

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I watched it a second time and focused on one of my spoiler thoughts from previous post:

The role of a specific object in the story:

The use/role of handcuffs. Tethered Lupita defends herself/saves herself with the handcuffs numerous times and flat out uses them to kill at least once. This HAS to be a statement of some sort about our criminal justice system, right? That can’t just be coincidental, could it?

Um....she had them on and so she used them.

I thought that the movie was fun, but it's no Get Out.
 
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Airola

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What a big disappointment this was.

Turned out it was more of a comedy than a horror movie and both the comedy and horror were way too ineffective. It was a bit boring but still promising early on in the movie and got really interesting when things started to happen, but the moment the villains opened their mouths it first became quite cringy as I didn't still know it's supposed to be funny too. I thought they tried to make them be creepy in their weirdness but just failed hard. Then when the comedy started the movie lost all its tension. Didn't feel the situations were tense anymore and couldn't care much about the characters.

I also held out hopes for it to have some really cool Twilight Zone horror thing going on based on the trailer but the whole thing was much less interesting what I had thought of after seeing the trailer.
 

Airola

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Almost felt like some bad M. Night film come the second half of the film.

Yeah, I had the exact same feeling. Got that feeling pretty early on. I really thought at some point that is this Peele making him be the second Shyamalan already in his second movie.
 

Christopher

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People I see are analyzing this movie like it’s a fucking Picasso painting it’s dissapointing and loses steam after the first half hour
 
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ViceUniverse

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People I see are analyzing this movie like it’s a fucking Picasso painting it’s dissapointing and loses steam after the first half hour

Well I think that there are three "hidden" social commentary points that are made about the movie. So there are things to unpack and discuss, but to me the movie is very simple.

US loses steam for a hot minute, but then picks back up. Overall it's a decent movie that is only meant to be watched once imo.
 
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JareBear

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People I see are analyzing this movie like it’s a fucking Picasso painting it’s dissapointing and loses steam after the first half hour

I apologize for enjoying the movie

I apologize for getting further enjoyment out of discussing themes and symbolism in all movies I see (when applicable)

Please forgive me

I meant you no harm, oh tortured soul
 
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Christopher

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I apologize for enjoying the movie

I apologize for getting further enjoyment out of discussing themes and symbolism in all movies I see (when applicable)

Please forgive me

I meant you no harm, oh tortured soul

Enjoy it all you want. I’m just so glad that you clearly see the deeper meaning in all this the social commentary...so deep.
 

Azula

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Felt torn on this film. The technical aspects of the film were amazing. The acting was brilliant. The cinematography amazing. And Peele feels like a master of building tension. It’s actually a very nuanced thing. This film wasn’t exaxctly scary in a physical sense, but was instead disturbing and creepy spiritually and within.

SPOILERS AHEAD

But where this film kind of fell flat for me, was the plot. And I’m torn because I don’t know if the story is problematic or not. I get a lot of people are arguing that the film is kept “ambiguous” so it’s up to interpretation. But IMO the story wasn’t that ambiguous in terms of the physical set up.

The film opens with text saying there is millions of tunnels and abandoned subways under the US, that people don’t know about. By the end of the film, they pretty much state that “they created clones, but that the soul is still attached to the clone. So “they” created clones and put them in these underground tunnels, to control the people on the surface (because you can influence people’s actions with the clones being tied to the real person by their soul).

We aren’t told who “they” are. Could be gov/ Illuminati type power groups. And they feed these “shadows” by feeding them rabbits. So it’s established that people are storing these clones underground to house them and feed them. Then one day one of the clones kidnaps a human from the surface and swaps places. Because a human was living among these shadows that can’t fully think or communicate, she’s able to organize all the clones/ shadows to rise up and take over the surface from the original humans (the scissors are so that they can cut the soul tethered between them and their origina self).

IMO this is the physical plot, and is established. Yes the film is heavily based on metaphors and is thematically heavy. But within the phsycial world, people are dying. The clones/ shadows have linked arms around the world and are physically affecting the world.

My issue then, is that while the metaphors about today’s society are interesting, I’m not sure if I love the actual lore of the movie. This idea that a single human is able to organize all the clones / shadows to have a revolution. That they all wear the same uniforms (that they were able to get all of that clothing). It also brings into question a lot of the main character. Did she always remember that she kidnapped her human self? So was all the crying and fear about going back to Santa Cruz BS? Why even go back?

Even if the answer is there, I’m not so sure that I even like the way the story is dished out. Almost happens too quickly, and doesn’t feel fleshed out. But does it even matter? Apart of me wishes there was no explanation, and it was just people being tormented by clones of themselves. With the answer being more ambiguous, and being about ones internal fight with their fears and demons. But by them having a physical plot, with lore etc. It kind of made it all real for me, and I’m not sure I really like the lore behind shadows / clones, and them being housed underground.

*phew*

All that said, I actually enjoyed it. I loved a lot of things about it. But left the theater feeling torn. I’ll have to watch this again. Definitely thinking a lot about it.
 
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JareBear

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This guy does good work


I think he nails it down pretty accurately. I didn’t even notice
the biblical reference my first time watching

Not really a spoiler but I’ll spoil it just out of caution
 

Mohonky

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Yeh i watch foundflix and his ending explained videos abit.

You guys are killing my excitement for this film. Im definitely seeing it no matter what though, especially after Get Out.
 

Azula

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Yeh i watch foundflix and his ending explained videos abit.

You guys are killing my excitement for this film. Im definitely seeing it no matter what though, especially after Get Out.

Film is technically great. Like I said, brilliant acting and amazing cinematography. He’s mastered tension building. I enjoyed this scene to scene. BUT, if you are someone that is more plot oriented, and care about that above else - then this might not be as good as Get Out for you.

Unique premise aside, I believe that if this was another director, this movie would get reemed more for the plot. But on the other hand, Peele is so damn good. And all the other elements in this film are incredible. Which is why I personally feel torn. Because if this was another director, none of the other elements would be this damn good.

Plus, there is a chance you end up loving the plot. I think the premise itself is unique. Just go in with an open mind, and let yourself hang on to each scene. Get wrapped up in the tension and have a fun time. My theater had people gasping and holding on to their date / loved one. It was a lot of fun.
 
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godhandiscen

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This movie was fantastic, and the social commentary was on point.

The "tethered", are a metaphor for individuals who are born without hope and whose existence sole purpose is to serve those who were born with more opportunities. Their revolution is a meaningless demonstration just like the original "Hands Across America" and a thousand other activist showings. Like Adelaide says to her kid at the end of the movie, "everything will go back to being the same".

It doesn't surprise me that a lot of individuals just don't see it or don't want to see it. I know, I am typing this from a $3k laptop built in a factory packed with workers whose lives resemble slavery; I can't judge. However, the message is loud and clear, and more difficult to digest when you realize that you are actually the monster.

I agree a lot with this interpretation of the movie, so I'll leave it here:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/danidi...s-jordan-peeles-us-really-about/#7b66c21f5583

PS: Props on calling out the people who bought that useless flamethrower, and then go on social media to post about equality and discrimination.
 
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mckmas8808

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This movie was fantastic, and the social commentary was on point.

The "tethered", are a metaphor for individuals who are born without hope and whose existence sole purpose is to serve those who were born with more opportunities. Their revolution is a meaningless demonstration just like the original "Hands Across America" and a thousand other activist showings. Like Adelaide says to her kid at the end of the movie, "everything will go back to being the same".

It doesn't surprise me that a lot of individuals just don't see it or don't want to see it. I know, I am typing this from a $3k laptop built in a factory packed with workers whose lives resemble slavery; I can't judge. However, the message is loud and clear, and more difficult to digest when you realize that you are actually the monster.

I agree a lot with this interpretation of the movie, so I'll leave it here:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/danidi...s-jordan-peeles-us-really-about/#7b66c21f5583

PS: Props on calling out the people who bought that useless flamethrower, and then go on social media to post about equality and discrimination.

No reason to say you can't judge just because you are typing on a $3K laptop. It's not like you can control the corporations that "hire" slaves to dig for those minerals. In the same way it's not the fault of the "normal people" that the "tethered" live the way they do.
 
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strange headache

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I haven't seen Peele's previous movie, but I watched this one at the cinema last week-end, and we all pretty much thought it was rather boring and tedious as neither the "social commentary", nor the horror aspects seem to work in this movie.

As a horror movie, it is just another slasher flick that fails to build any kind of suspense, not once did I find myself scared. On the contrary, I cringed myself through most of the scenes that were seeping with misplaced humor, be it the bumbling dad or the dysfunctional rich neighbors with their malfunctioning Alexa clone. The kills were all rather unimaginative and the weird choice of music ruined most scenes. Watching preteens smash in skulls with a golf-club to the tune of "f*ck the police" by NWA felt more forced than anything else really.

Throughout the movie, I really didn't care about the characters at all because all of them were rather cardboard cut-out, be it the middle-class family or the rich neighbors. The mother was your standard traumatized slasher flick victim, the children were nondescript and merely served as emotional bait, the father was basically Homer Simpson and all you get from the neighbors is that they are your stereotypical well-off but dysfunctional superficial and consumerist fools who can't raise their children right.

The social commentary was also rather bland and doesn't really work, for numerous reasons. First of all, the message is nothing new and something that you've already heard on numerous occasions. As far as I understood, the gist of it is that our luxurious first world lifestyle is the result of a blind consumerism at the expense of other humans that are exploited to produce our goods in inhuman conditions. There's reason why the underground looks like a shopping mall. While the moral message isn't wrong, the movie fails to bring anything new to the table as it is beating the dead horse of our globalist capitalistic exploitation system. You're really better off just watching a documentary on Coltan mining or assembly-line work in China. Besides, other works of fiction have done a much better job presenting this anti-consumerist message, like "Snowpiercer", "American Psycho", "Fight Club", "Mad Max" or "They Live".

Heck, if you want to see this treated in an equally humorous but thought-provoking way, just watch "Modern Times" released in 1936 by Charlie Chaplin:


Another reason why the social commentary doesn't really work is because the movie tries to explain the "shadows" or "doppelgängers" in the most hamfisted way. It's something about thousands of miles of unexplored underground tunnels and secret cloning facilities that were abandoned by "the man". If you want people to explore the deeper aspects of your social criticism, then why prevent them from doing so by providing this derivative drivel of an explanation? It also doesn't help that the "shadows" are all blood-thirsty murderers who are out to simply kill us and "hold hands". Which only flies in the face of the message you're trying to convey in the first place because it makes the audience pretty much unsympathetic to their underground struggle.

Lastly, you can see the plot twist coming from a mile away and also contradicts the message of the movie. Basically, if you want to have a good life you need to swap roles thus, condemning another person to a life of suffering. I mean, yeah, I get it, materialism is a zero-sum game, but nowhere does the movie present an alternative view on happiness, be it immaterialistic values, intellectual pleasure or philosophical contemplation. The "shadows" want the exact same thing as the "originals" and in their social envy they are just as willing to exploit others to reach their materialistic goals. The mother's "shadow" explains this pretty well by saying that every time the original family had a hot, tasty meal, their counterparts ate "raw, bloody rabbit", and every time their children got plushy toys, they got "cold sharp tools that cut your fingers".

One of the reasons this movie fails where others succeeded, is because its underlying Hobbesian message is purely nihilistic in its one-sided presentation of human nature. The other movies that I've cited at least try to present the audience with a different world-view that could allow it to escape this consumerist hamster wheel. "Us" on the other hand, seems contempt with its simplistic moral messaging. You're either part of the hamster wheel or you're doomed to suffer, that's it.

In the end, "Us" is a boring horror slasher flick that fails on numerous levels to bring across its tedious social message. It is neither entertaining from a horror perspective, nor very effective in making you think.
 
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JareBear

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I haven't seen Peele's previous movie, but I watched this one at the cinema last week-end, and we all pretty much thought it was rather boring and tedious as neither the "social commentary", nor the horror aspects seem to work in this movie.

As a horror movie, it is just another slasher flick that fails to build any kind of suspense, not once did I find myself scared. On the contrary, I cringed myself through most of the scenes that were seeping with misplaced humor, be it the bumbling dad or the dysfunctional rich neighbors with their malfunctioning Alexa clone. The kills were all rather unimaginative and the weird choice of music ruined most scenes. Watching preteens smash in skulls with a golf-club to the tune of "f*ck the police" by NWA felt more forced than anything else really.

Throughout the movie, I really didn't care about the characters at all because all of them were rather cardboard cut-out, be it the middle-class family or the rich neighbors. The mother was your standard traumatized slasher flick victim, the children were nondescript and merely served as emotional bait, the father was basically Homer Simpson and all you get from the neighbors is that they are your stereotypical well-off but dysfunctional superficial and consumerist fools who can't raise their children right.

The social commentary was also rather bland and doesn't really work, for numerous reasons. First of all, the message is nothing new and something that you've already heard on numerous occasions. As far as I understood, the gist of it is that our luxurious first world lifestyle is the result of a blind consumerism at the expense of other humans that are exploited to produce our goods in inhuman conditions. There's reason why the underground looks like a shopping mall. While the moral message isn't wrong, the movie fails to bring anything new to the table as it is beating the dead horse of our globalist capitalistic exploitation system. You're really better off just watching a documentary on Coltan mining or assembly-line work in China. Besides, other works of fiction have done a much better job presenting this anti-consumerist message, like "Snowpiercer", "American Psycho", "Fight Club", "Mad Max" or "They Live".

Heck, if you want to see this treated in an equally humorous but thought-provoking way, just watch "Modern Times" released in 1936 by Charlie Chaplin:


Another reason why the social commentary doesn't really work is because the movie tries to explain the "shadows" or "doppelgängers" in the most hamfisted way. It's something about thousands of miles of unexplored underground tunnels and secret cloning facilities that were abandoned by "the man". If you want people to explore the deeper aspects of your social criticism, then why prevent them from doing so by providing this derivative drivel of an explanation? It also doesn't help that the "shadows" are all blood-thirsty murderers who are out to simply kill us and "hold hands". Which only flies in the face of the message you're trying to convey in the first place because it makes the audience pretty much unsympathetic to their underground struggle.

Lastly, you can see the plot twist coming from a mile away and also contradicts the message of the movie. Basically, if you want to have a good life you need to swap roles thus, condemning another person to a life of suffering. I mean, yeah, I get it, materialism is a zero-sum game, but nowhere does the movie present an alternative view on happiness, be it immaterialistic values, intellectual pleasure or philosophical contemplation. The "shadows" want the exact same thing as the "originals" and in their social envy they are just as willing to exploit others to reach their materialistic goals. The mother's "shadow" explains this pretty well by saying that every time the original family had a hot, tasty meal, their counterparts ate "raw, bloody rabbit", and every time their children got plushy toys, they got "cold sharp tools that cut your fingers".

One of the reasons this movie fails where others succeeded, is because its underlying Hobbesian message is purely nihilistic in its one-sided presentation of human nature. The other movies that I've cited at least try to present the audience with a different world-view that could allow it to escape this consumerist hamster wheel. "Us" on the other hand, seems contempt with its simplistic moral messaging. You're either part of the hamster wheel or you're doomed to suffer, that's it.

In the end, "Us" is a boring horror slasher flick that fails on numerous levels to bring across its tedious social message. It is neither entertaining from a horror perspective, nor very effective in making you think.

Damn. Laying the smack down.

I disagree, but well thought out and well written post here.
 
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